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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> so what's the president doing? four speeches in seven days. >> if folks in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. fast food workers across the country who say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job to demand higher wages. now the economy is adding jobs, but those new jobs pay less than the ones lost during the recession. the president worries the growing income gap will fray america's social fabric. even the good news isn't as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the company's warehouse workers take home just $24,000 a year, barely above the poverty line. america may still be the land of opportunity, but those opportunities pay less and less. in brazil, in greece, in france, we've seen protesters take to the streets in those countries demanding economic reform, demanding workers' rights, financial fairness. in short, a better life. could we see that kind of fervor here in the united sta
$250 million for "the washington post." 1% of his personal fortune. as our jim accosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's newsrooms. >> watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters, bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned "the washington post" lead by it's publisher kathryn graham now the legacy in the future of one of the most important newspapers rest in the hands of one billionaire, amazon found jeff b bezos. gives new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> the "post" now follows other major newspapers. "the wall street journal" bought by murdoch and "the boston globe." >> i think what people are forgetting when we're talking about billionaires taking over the media, that's not exactly new. >> william randolph everyoherst how wealth -- >> i expect to lose a million dollars next year. you know, at the rate of a million dollars a year i'll have to close this place in 60 years. >> something bezos has in common. remaking the selling th
in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle-class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. >> make our wages super size! >> fast food workers across the country say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job. the economy is adding new jobs but they pay less than the ones we lost during the row session. the president worries the growing income gap will fray the social gap. it's not as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the workers take just over $24,000 a year. america may still be the land of opportunity but those opportunities still pay less and less. >> in brazil, grease, and france, we see them taking to the streets for, in short, a better life. can we see that kind of fervor in the united states? it's not exactly arab spring, don't get me wrong but many walked off in order to get better pay. austan goolsbee is the chairman of the economic advisers and ryan porter with "the new york times." austan could this be the beginning of a movement o
's a political problem that has to do with incredible polarization in washington. >> so it's a washington problem. do you think the economy would be doing better if washington had its act together a little more. part-time jobs, low-wage jobs, temporary service sector jobs. one economist described this to me as a bartender economy. is that what a recovery is supposed to look like, and can we keep a middle class strong and america the driver for the world if these are the kinds of jobs we're creating? >> no, that's not how the recovery should look like, and we are capable of so much more. and it's not just about the here and now, it's also about the fact that most americans feel for the first time that their kids' generation will be worse off than theirs. so two things that need to happen. one is at the macro level, washington needs to act on the three problems we have: insufficient demand, insufficient structure reforms, and we have to remove some debt issues. then at the micro level, we have to empower and enable incredible tale talent, and this is about retoor retooling and retraining. >> mark,
. then there's jeff bezos. the amazon founder is shelling out $250 million for the "washington post," a paltry 1% of his personal fortune. as our jim acosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's "newsroom." >> reporter: watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> reporter: but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned the "washington post" led by its publisher, kathryn graham, now that leg gas sin the future of one of the most important newspaper rests in the hands of one billionaire, amazon founder, jeff bezos, a stunning $250 million deal that gives an all new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> reporter: the post now follows other major newspapers. "wall street journal" bought by conservative media titan robert murdoch and "boston globe" purchased by red sox owner john henry to be snatched up by the super wealthy and perhaps the "new york times" could land in the portfolio of libertarian billi billionaires, robert and charles cope. >> i think it's not
valuable at $1.8 billion followed by washington redskins, new york giants and texans. >>> the university of texas rakes in the most cash for its merchandise according to the collegiate licensing company. the eighth year in a row. finally, football is coming back to los angeles. arena football, that is. the la kiss will start playing in 2014 and the rock band kiss backing that team along with other investors. it's affordable. season tickets start at just $99. you have to provide the face paint. >>> up next, after back to back triple digit losses, what's behind the pullback in stocks? vo: getting your car serviced at meineke, smart. saving time by booking an appointment online, even smarter. online scheduling. available now at meineke.com. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfectly fresh. tonight i'm using the just the two of us sett
on washington, new civil rights leaders descend on the lincoln memorial where martin luther king, jr. once told us he had a dream. >> come on, let's go! >>> the fast-moving wildfire that has consumed 165 square miles has entered yosemite national park. and having doubled in size in just one day, it's now bearing down on thousands of structures. >>> she was tried, convicted and monday she'll be back in
economy. there are many people in the washington, d.c. region laid off and fired or furloughed, whatever, and on a personal level it affected a lot of people, and the problem, christine, in all likelihood without a deal, which is looking pretty unlikely, we are going to have sequester for still another year. >> still another year. and here we are, possibly on the verge of a possible attack on syria, and congress and the president will be fighting over whether we should pay our bills. doesn't it make us look petty in the eyes of the world? >> you would think so. it's going to be a very rocky fall in my opinion for the markets. you have instability in the middle east, and the whole side issue of iran may be getting angry if it's ally is attacked and not having talks on the nuclear program, and you have the federal reserve maybe changing its policy in a very significant way, and you have got a potential debacle on the debt ceiling. late october is going to be a crucial time for the markets because i don't see a deal right now. >> you have stock fund managers up 14%, and it was an awful augu
or japan or germany or mexico. we do need to get competitive in washington. i mean, we have to take competitiveness seriously. how do we make american companies the most efficient in the world? how do we give them an edge? i think when you talk about the big tax increase this year, when you talk about, you know, cap and trade legislation, when you talk about things like, you know, raising the minimum wage. i think those are things that make america less competitive and, therefore, make it very difficult for american companies to compete. >> you certainly would like to see american ceos let hold of the purse strings, get some c confidence and start growing stuff here again. record amounts of cash. what is it going to take to unbottle that. we'll talk about it next time. dan, stephen, thanks. >>> up knicnext, more about mak college more affordable. president obama wants students to get a better return. we're going to take a closer look at why costs are climbing and whether this president's plan can stop that relentless rise. >>> college is the gateway to the middle class but that gate
is if it gets really crazy in washington, then the world starts rushing into treasuries again for a safe haven. so it's kind of -- i don't know, what's your anticipation for what all that would mean for interest rates here? >> so interest rates are responding to three different things. one is less fed support, and that's why interest rates have gone up over the recent few weeks. second, there's an outflow of money from bond funds because people are worried that bonds may not be as safe. and then, thirdly, we've had some economic healing. we believe that at this level of interest rates, the market is attractive again as long as you remain in shorter matures. so up to seven-year treasuries, in high quality municipal bonds, and in high quality corporate bonds, but be careful of the long end and be careful of low quality issuance. >> all right. you heard it here directly. thank you so much. nice to see you. thank you. >>> coming up, a win for paula deen in the courtroom but is she winning back her big-time sponsors? find out next. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004. vietnam in 1972. [ all ]
think it could. rehear all these plans out of washington. almost all of them go nowhere because it requires democrats in congress to agree and actually pass something. this would be the department of education, which is already collecting this kind of data from colleges, basically putting this into a format that allows you to compare schools. what it will do is make consumers better shoppers for college. so you will have more tools that will help you figure out, where do you get the best return on your investment? you said that before, i think that's exactly the way people need to be thinking about college education. it's an investment. would you invest your retirement savings in something if you had no idea what the return was? you wouldn't. >> i think a lot of families don't think about it early enough. it's about four years we showed you the numbers, so for four years in a row, you would buy a new car. you would go insane if you had to buy a new car four years in a row. there are also kids buying mercedes when they can only afford to get a used car. >> people think if i go to
gave that i'm sure you recall on may 23rd at the national defense university here in washington, in which he basically said, we need to wind down the wars we've had over the last decade. he specifically referred to the authorization for the use of military force which congress voted shortly after 9/11, which is the authorization that allows the united states to go to war in afghanistan and also in pakistan, to some degree yemen directed al qaeda. he said, i will not basically renew an authorization for the use of military force. i won't sign that into law. and he was really calling for the end of this sort of war that we've been in. so if you look at what he just said, which i think was, by the way, one of the better speeches i've heard him deliver, that this is really in the context of somebody who wants to get us out of a permanent state of war, who understands that it's not just about his presidency but any future presidency, that if you have this kind of conflict that you really should go to congress and get authorization. he is, after all, a constitutional law professor. th
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)